Adoptive Families

Did You Know?

  • In 2007 there were nearly 1.8 million adopted children in the US—(2%) of all children. 1
  • The majority of adopted children fare well on 6 measures of socio-emotional well-being. 88% of adopted children ages 6 and older exhibit positive social behaviors.1
  • 81% of adopted children have parents who reported their relationship with their child as very warm and close. In addition, 42 percent had parents report the relationship as “better than ever expected,” with only 15 percent reporting the relationship as “more difficult” than they ever expected.”1

  • Consider these tips to help you raise successful kids.
  • Remember, families come in so many different shapes and forms these days. Celebrate this and highlight your kids’ awareness by seeking out books or movies that show complex family structures as a regular part of the world.
  • Create a family tree art project together with your kids. Use any materials you like—magazines, construction paper, paint, string, objects from nature. Label by name the many folks involved in your kids’ histories. Let the “branches” be as multiple and “crazy” as necessary to include everyone—parents, grandparents, siblings of all varieties, aunts, uncles, friends, pets, second cousins’ divorced husbands with the cool car. Everyone. Then display it, step back and enjoy the beauty together.
  • Get more ideas for family fun activities >
  • Consider involving your kids in support groups, educational ventures or clubs designed to support non-traditional families. Having them spend time with others who have a non-traditional family experience can allow them to feel understood, as well as giving them a place to share experiences with other folks who know what their unique challenges are. And it may give you an afternoon off now and then!
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    1. Vandivere, S., Malm, K., & Radel, L. (2009). Adoption USA: A Chartbook Based on the 2007 National Survey ofAdoptive Parents. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. Retrieved from http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/09/NSAP/chartbook/index.pdf

    2. Bramlett, M. D. (2011). The National Survey of Adoptive Parents: Benchmark estimates of school performance and family relationship quality for adopted children. Washington, D.C.: U. S Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. Retrieved from http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/09/NSAP/Brief3/rb.pdf