ParentFurther Blog


By Amy Williams, Guest Blogger

Unfortunately, depression in children is real. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry estimates that 5 percent of all children suffer from depression.

Other Blog Posts

By: Marie Williams

Today’s multimedia culture has created many more avenues to expose teens to risky and dangerous choices that not too long ago, were beyond the realm of teenagers’ access and imagination. That’s the bad news. The good news is that many of the strategies for sound parenting remain the same. Read more >>

By: Tricia Cornell

When kids are tiny, the default term for other kids is “friends.” What did you and your friends do today? Be nice to your friend.(Meaning, of course, "that other toddler you just met at the playground.”) Then, at some point, most kids figure out, Hey. These kids aren’t all my friends. Some of them are my friends. And some of them are just kids in my class. And that kid over there? I’m not sure I like him at all. Read more >>

By: Susan Ragsdale

Halloween is the family holiday in our household. But for some, this holiday holds controversy. Depending on your religious viewpoint, there are a variety of opinions as to how or if to celebrate this holiday. For us, it is one of the pure-fun holidays out there. It's a holiday where kids can simply be kids. It taps into imagination and creativity as children dream of their costumes. Halloween also allows kids to face their fears. Read more >>

By: Susan Ragsdale

Make a Difference Day, the national day of doing good, is one of my favorite service days of the year. I love the idea that millions of people can come together and dedicate their day to actively doing something to make the world a better place. And the words “make a difference” hold power and remind us that we CAN make a difference through sharing of our talents, availability, time, effort and voice. Read more >>

By: Marie Williams

As parents, we know all too well that adulthood will come soon enough, and with it we lose many things that cannot be recaptured; one of the best gifts we can give our kids is the opportunity to savor their childhood. Read more >>

Today's guest blogger, Parth Singh, was a former member of the Unmask the Media Project, a student-run program, developed by the Tulsa, Oklahoma Youth Philanthropy Initiative, that addresses the issue of the media’s negative effects on teenager’s self-perceptions. His blog is the third in a series of three "Young Voices" blogs, where some of our young friends lend their perspective on what it means to be a digital citizen. Read more >>

Today's guest blogger, Kedrica Taylor, was a former member of the Unmask the Media Project, a student-run program, developed by the Tulsa, Oklahoma Youth Philanthropy Initiative, that addresses the issue of the media’s negative effects on teenager’s self-perceptions. Her blog is the second in a series of three "Young Voices" blogs, where some of our young friends lend their perspective on what it means to be a digital citizen. Read more >>

By: Jennifer Griffin-Wiesner

Since learning several years ago of their existence, I’ve regularly threatened to send my kids to "manners school." The threat typically happens in moments during dinner when they are animatedly arguing the details of a story, mouths chock full of rice and veggies, corn on the cob, or otherwise highly-spewable foods. Our teacher friend, Jane, I remind them, put her kids through her own version of etiquette training a few summers ago. “Maybe I’ll hire Jane to shape you up.” Read more >>

Today's guest blogger, April Gordon, is an active member of the Unmask the Media Project, a student-run program, developed by the Tulsa, Oklahoma Youth Philanthropy Initiative, that addresses the issue of the media’s negative effects on teenager’s self-perceptions. Her blog is the first in a series of three "Young Voices" blogs, where some of our young friends will lend their perspective on what it means to be a digital citizen. Read more >>

By: Mary Margaret Reagan-Montiel, Guest Blogger

Growing up in a multicultural family gave me the opportunity to live knowing that we share more commonalities than differences. Self-identity is, in part, passed down from the previous generation, but it's also something you get to choose for yourself as an adult. Read more >>