ParentFurther Blog


By: Becky Post

Many families spend a lot of time in vehicles in the summer, whether it involves a long driving trip or running kids to soccer tournaments. July is National Purposeful Parenting Month and a perfect time to connect with your children occurs in the car.

Other Blog Posts

By: Marie Williams

This Black History Month, I will be taking full advantage of the opportunity to teach my daughter not only about where we came from, but the reasons we will never go back…Read more >

By: Susan Ragsdale

There’s a new holiday on the horizon—Valentine’s Day! While stores around us try to focus our attention on roses, chocolates, cards and potential dinner dates, I want to suggest that families focus on the “heart” of the holiday by reflecting on how love is expressed in the home. Read more >

By: Marie Williams
Today, more than ever before--and at earlier ages than ever before--our kids are consistently receiving information about romance, dating, and sex from multiple sources besides parents. Television, the Internet, and peers can all contribute to ideas about sex that may be inaccurate or incomplete. And today's reality is that the traditional view of "The Talk" assumes that young people are almost completely ignorant about sex and sexuality. Well, they aren’t. But parents need not panic! Remember that you know your kid better than anyone. No one can tell you with any certainty what’s best for you to say, or decide the right time for you to say it. Here are some essential guidelines to help you start thinking about the conversation. Read more >

By: Ann Saylor

When cabin fever starts to kick in, it’s time to get creative! Here are some fun ways to make indoor memories with your family when it’s cold outside. Get tips >

By: Vicki Bohling

Every family has strengths, but some families also have weaknesses. Research has shown that adults raised in dysfunctional families frequently report difficulties forming and maintaining intimate relationships, maintaining positive self-esteem, and trusting others; they fear a loss of control, and deny their feelings and reality. It’s true—our early influences can leave behind deep grooves—both good and bad— that we tend to carry around for the rest of our lives. Dysfunction can be a difficult cycle to break, but it is possible. In my work with families, I refer to this process as “pioneer parenting”. For all pioneers who have been the first to enter new territory, the road is often long and bumpy, but the destination points can be incredibly rewarding and the legacy is definitely priceless. Learn more >

By: Jennifer Griffin-Wiesner

Mom, Can I Sleep at Jack’s Tonight?

Ah, sleepovers…the epicenter, thus far, of peer pressure and questionable teenage behavior in my son’s life. As my kids have gotten older, I realize that I was unprepared for the transition from the little kid mega-event of a sleepover to the casual, “Mom, can I sleep at ____’s tonight.” This new, impromptu “crashing at someone’s house” version of sleepovers can bring along with it a series of puzzling (and maybe even disturbing) scenarios that will make you ask—both of your kid and of the host parents—“Really???” Read more >

By: Tricia Cornell

We’ve all done it. Our eyes roll up into our eyelids; we curl the corners of our mouths—maybe we even let out a little snort. It’s the dreaded eye-roll, and it’s the ultimate sassy retort. Chances are, we’ve also seen our tweens and teens do it. Maybe their versions include a shoulder shrug or an under-the-breath mutter, “Whatever,” or “Yeah, right,” or some other creatively sarcastic reply. Read more >

By: Vicki Bohling

If there’s only one thing I’ve learned about parenting after all these years, it’s that the easiest way to parent isn’t always the best way. But, I’ve also learned that there are essentially two universal truths to parenting that every parent should own, accept, and practice every day—no matter what age, stage, phase, or season of parenting you may be weathering. Read more >

By: Jennifer Griffin-Wiesner

In our 15 years of parenting, Shop Guy* and I have learned that the art of parenting includes expecting the unexpected. I’m sure we’ve stared at one another in disbelief (at least once a week) over something baffling one of our kind, sensible kids has done. Read more >