ParentFurther Blog


By: Dr. Gene Roehlkepartain

Setting expectations for our kids is an ongoing challenge for parents. On the one hand, it’s easy to communicate what we expect. Yet that doesn't necessarily go far enough.

Other Blog Posts

By: Marie Williams

Almost daily, we’re faced with delivering the news to our kids that they are “not in charge” and yes, actually, they need to “do what I say because I am the parent!” And if they still refuse, you have to put some muscle behind it: curtail some of their freedoms, take away a privilege, or use stern language. If you are still struggling to find a positive way to discipline your kids, you’re not alone. It’s tough, and it’s a balancing act. As parents, we almost always want to give kids what they want and when we can’t, it may make us feel guilty. Read more >

By: Steve Palmer

Don’t we all wonder why we are who we are? Why are some of us more outgoing, more conscientious, or more assertive than others, for instance? I know I have certainly been curious about this as I’ve tried to understand myself and others. It’s probably one of the reasons I went into the study of psychology in the first place! Anyone who has more than one child has probably already noticed how kids seem different right from the start. Read more >

By: Ann Saylor

April Fool’s Day can be a fun holiday for making family memories, but sometimes kids can get caught up in pranks and cross the line between funny and inappropriate. I’ve done it too. I once wrapped my uncle’s car doors shut with plastic wrap and put uncooked rice in all of his air conditioning vents. I thought it was hysterical, but he was not so happy about the damage to his car! It was a hard lesson learned. Read more >

By: Michele Timmons

“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.” ~Dr. Seuss

Childhood is sometimes wonderful and sometimes totally awful. Most of us remember times when we just didn’t fit in. Those can be some of the most painful memories of our youth. As parents, we always want our children to be happy and to feel connected and loved. When our children hurt, we hurt for them and want to do something to make it better. However, when it comes to fitting in, there is no magic bullet. While I can’t offer a quick fix, here are some strategies to help your child build the self confidence and resiliency skills to help overcome this problem AND prepare him for life’s many setbacks. Read more >

Since some of us here at ParentFuther have read the Hunger Games series (and some of us haven’t) we thought that taking an afternoon off to watch the just-released Hunger Games film would be an interesting opportunity to weigh in on the ratings, controversy, and hype surrounding the film and books. So, as good researchers do, we closed up shop at noon, piled into Mary Margaret’s car, and headed to the movie theater to catch the Friday matinee of The Hunger Games. Here is our review! >>

By: Steve Palmer

When our youngest daughter reached speaking age, we began to notice a concerning pattern. She had always been a shy child during her toddler years, but as she continued to develop, we started to realize that her tendency to hold back in interactions with others was becoming more pronounced. Specifically, she would not speak to anyone outside the immediate family. She never said anything. Not a word. Yet, while at home (where she was comfortable), she would gab away. Read more >

By: Jennifer Griffin-Wiesner

Sass. Tantrums. Whining. Shop Guy (my husband) and I have seen it all—and then some. Fortunately, I was an emotional kid too (okay, bratty at times), despite having fabulous parents whom I adore. That perspective let me know that these behaviors weren’t about us being bad parents or having bad kids. They resulted from dynamics of personality and situation. Read more >

By: Michele Timmons

As our children grow and develop, we have the opportunity to spend less and less time with them. By taking the time to set and enforce clear boundaries and expectations when they are young, our voices stay with them when they’re out on their own. Read more >

By: Guest Blogger, Lauren Bailey

Building self-esteem isn’t as easy as patting your child on the back and telling her how great she is. The following are some concrete tips that parents can implement to develop a strong sense of self-worth in their teenagers. Get tips >

By: Steve Palmer

One of the most important skills we can teach our kids is empathy. Empathy is the ability to see and value what another person is feeling or experiencing. When we see someone in pain and feel that response in our own gut, that’s empathy. When we see someone crying tears of joy at an important reunion and notice ourselves choking up, that’s empathy. When we see someone struggling with a problem and feel an emotional pull to help, that’s empathy. It’s a core skill for what psychologists call “pro-social” behavior – the actions that are involved in building close relationships, maintaining friendships, and developing strong communities. It appears to be the central reality necessary for developing a conscience, as well. Read more >